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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)
washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. the game is a special case in his successful second term was so brief. it's interesting to note that only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first were james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president-elect did to a second term and the reasons for those failed for a troubled second term. for failed because of a water seems on unwinnable. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the foyer. also for a failed because of the economic crisis for failure to act and deter such a crises. these are jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt's and george bush. it failed due to their inability to lead congress for jefferson, monroe, grant, well some, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. for he did not affect the philly communicate their agendas or initiatives for jefferson, monroe, grant in cleveland. obviously failure for second term president has been their inability to successfully wor
george washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln as its successful -- special case and that his second term was so brief. the it is interesting to note that only the president who had a more successful second term than their first was james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the presidents elected to a second term, and the reasons for those that have experienced failed or troubled second terms. for failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable, or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also, for failed because of economic crisis for failure to act to deter such a crisis. these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt from the 37 downturn, and george bush. at failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grants, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. to failed due to hubris, franklin roosevelt, and richard nixon are the four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiatives were jefferso
of of honor, booker t. washington, theodore roosevelt and the white house dinner that shook the nation. why did this dinner drive the nation nuts? >> this dinner is a remarkable moment in history that has been completely forgotten, and it's because we just don't know about scandals like this. you know, our meter has changed. when booker t. washington walked up the five steps to the white house, he was the very first african-american to be invited to sit at the president's table. it had never happened before. african-americans had been invited to meet with presidents in their offices, they, you know, had business meetings all the time, but no one ever sat at the president's table. and the nation was outraged. it was really astonishing. >> why was he invited, by the way? >> el, booker t -- well, booker t. washington had a very, very successful working relationship with theodore roosevelt, and he were working together to try to fix the race problem which was just as much with us, obviously, in 1901 as it is today, and, um, they were partnering to try to bring right-minded people into governmen
in our latest game of the week poll. some great games for you to choose from. wilson at theodore roosevelt. we'll announce the winner. >> that hockey game is going to be the same weekend going into inauguration. it is going to be a crazy weekend. >> and we are going to be crazy busy. >> yes, we are. derek will sigh at 7:00. have a great night. wusa9.com is always on. bye. at your neighborhood sub the big hot pastrami melt. we perfected the pastrami sandwich -- filled with hot, juicy pastrami, pickles, yellow mustard and bubbly melted cheese. all piled-high on our signature freshly baked bread. made hot, toasty and just for you. and don't be afraid to put your spin on this deli style deliciousity -- add your favorite ingredients, like spicy jalapeÑos or crisp green peppers. get to your local subway and taste some perfect pastrami today! subway. eat fresh.
dakota. george washington, thomas jefferson, theodore roosevelt etched in stone forever. but is there room for another? conservatives long argued their idol, president reagan is is worthy of the honor. but what about this? does president obama deserve to be up there with the others? it is a question raised in the national journal today. and it has everyone talking and debating. joining me now is the host of "the cycle" here on msnbc, and abbey huntsman, host and producer. thank you both for your time. >> thank you. >> what about those who say obama is not ready? reagan should be there first. >> i am not ready to put reagan on mount rushmore at all. we're talking literally, we're not really literally going to have a sculptor and chise los angeles new name -- we're going to do it, you and i? >> okay, all right. >> reagan or -- >> i'm not putting up reagan at all. i'm not ready to put up obama, i think he had a very strong first term, saving detroit, ending two wars, changed american fundamental ways, especially as much as you could from the dump that bush left us with. but
been used to swear in almost every president. theodore roosevelt did not use one in his inauguration. some presidents open the bible to specific passages, like bill clinton who rested his hand on galatia galatians, chapter 6, verse 8. some presidents use two bibles. the inaugural parade dates back to the days of george washington, but his parade was fairly small, not the spectacle we see today. >> i think the modern parade, what we'll be watching on monday really emanates from 1904 when theodore roosevelt had geronimo and apache warriors come and had fur trappers and outdoors people. since then, each year, the parade seemed to get better and better. ♪ >> in 1837 martin van buren became the first president to use hail to the chief at his swearing-in, which was held in march. march 4th was the previous inauguration date because it four presidents with lame duck status. the tradition of the inaugural ball started with james and dolly madison in 1809. the tradition so popular, presidents starting with dwight eisenhower began holding multiple parties. john f. kennedy attended five inaug
the president, you might not like his politics, but he's the only one we have." >> reporter: theodore roosevelt, in 1905, was the first president to draw massive crowds. but, in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war two was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> "but that was a very unique year, 1945, and most normal situations, even if we're in a recession or we're in a foreign war we still throw pretty big inaugurals." >> reporter: for maurice madden. it is mainly a big moment. >> "i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say, you know, that i was part of american history and that really means a lot to me." >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, c-n-n, washington. >> hundreds of thousands of people will be able to witness the event. but they won't be able to share the event as easily as they would hope. >> it looks like it is going to be a bit more mild than it was four years ago. partly to mostly cloudy skies with a few late shower possibilities. clear skies and relatively mild. 5
. >> host: what about him? >> guest: he had a very successful relationship with theodore roosevelt. they were working together to try to fix the race problem in which is just as much with us in 1901 as today. say were trying to bring like-minded people to government and have these conversations and one day roosevelt said why can't i invite him choo-chooing me for dinner and makes business with pleasure? it was innocent and unleashed the incredible outpouring of indignation from all over the world because it never happened before. >> host: was the president's schedule always public? how did they find out? >> guest: it was always public and covered by a a lowly journalist who probably hated the job and his job to report he had lunch with someone so and the dinner to place in the evening and at about midnight the journalist looked at the president's schedule and probably rubbed his eyes because he saw a broker to washington dined with the president. the news went out on the wire and it was like a thunderclap and had 5 inches headlines coach said things we literally cannot repeat today
. but under theodore roosevelt. what happened to that party that wants to keep our food safe and environment clean that could distinguish between regulations that matter to life and not beyond the meaningless one taxing business to death? that could disseven the difference between an smart government and excessive government that brought us our national parks. what happened to that party? the party whose first slogan, free soil, free men and now it's free fall. they have forgotten their past. a party that defined itself not what it could give you but the boundless opportunities this country could employ you. abraham lincoln i saw in that movie spoke at a time when republican ideals wasn't a script. it was their core. it was real. abraham lincoln was real. forget about harry reid trying to show democrats a movie that provided a lesson in backbone. how about republicans watch it on their own and then and then, maybe just look in the mirror. all right. we're going to have a lot more on this with rudy guliani picking apart what has happened to our country and to our party. it's a personal respon
the biography by edmund morris of theodore roosevelt. result, of course, the american president made a lot of political capital out of attacking at least rhetorically and in practice serving what he called a criminal elite. this is in the 1900's, early 20th century. this is a 1950. approximately 2000 individuals are in a position to control and direct industry. 27,000 giant firms constituting only 1% -- employ over 50% of the people engaged in business today. so while you can say that on the subject of level there has certainly been a downturn in optimism and a sense of momentum, on the actual level of political and economic control, it is not that change, it is just that things have fallen their natural involution to a higher degree. so what we have today is precisely what roosevelt willed about 100 years ago and what was noted in 1950. in fact, what marx predicted in the 19th century. so those of us that are prone to fall into despair over what is going on and who feel depressed about it, and we thing to explain our despair and depression by what is happening on the outside of us in the
washington, thomas jefferson, theodore roosevelt and abraham lincoln etched in stone forever. but is there room for another? conservatives have long argued their idoled president ronald reagan is worthy of the honor. but does president obama deserve to be up there with the others? it's a provocative question being raised in an article in the "national journal" today and it has everyone talking and debating. joining me now is host of "the cycle, msnbc and abbey huntsman. thank you boet for your time. >> what about those who say obama isn't ready? reagan should go there first. i'm not ready to put reagan on mount rushmore at all. we're talking figuratively, right? >> you're on politics nation. we have chizles and hammers here. >> okay. all right. >> reagan or obama? >> i'll put up reagan, you can put up obama. we'll chisel together. >> i think he had a very strong first term, saving detroit, ending two wars, aca, changed americans fundamentally, as best he could from the dump that bush left us. but i want to see a little bit more. what are you going to be able to do with immigr
do something about that to better elections in the future. >> that's a great question. theodore roosevelt, an 1880s, he decides he wants to do with politics. all of his friends said when he doing? and roosevelt said, i am going to the german and irish bars. and they said how can you do that. there are germans and irishmen are. [laughter] and he said, local power in the city is decided in those solutions. and you can sit set up their and your penthouse only one. i want to be in the room where the decision is made. this is where i so deeply disagree with our consulting class and the comments of our last nominee. i don't see demographic problems. what do you think are asian-americans won't? want a good education. they are passionate. they love their children and they invest heavily in them. they invest more heavily in him than any other ethnic group in america. i saw a survey this morning they came out. guess what the number one validation of achievement as seen by college students is today? twenty-five or 30 years from now, how do you know you will be successful? by owning house w
thought of something theodore roosevelt did not think of, and he knew it would drive him wild to think that he missed that opportunity. ever since wilson, almost all president of the united states have taken the opportunity to go to congress in hers and. jefferson -- to go to congress in person. jefferson, as i say, was trying to downplay a lot of the ceremony, but he also understood the need for an inauguration. he understood the purpose of it. after a divisive election, the election of 1800 was one of the most divisive, and everybody has to choose sides, the inauguration is the moment that we all come back together again. this is not a presidential candidate. this is the person that was elected. this is the person that is going to lead the country for the next four years. we need to put aside the elections, heal the wounds of the election. so, in the election, jefferson says we are all federalists, we are all republicans, basically, we are all americans, coming together and we are going to work together. this is the hope that every president has is -- in his inaugural address, and th
inaugural. but also theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan. i look at it more as a form of relaxation for the president when we get to meet him. he gets to chew the fat a lit bit about past presidents. >> doris, you're a presidential expert, how do you rate president obama in the pantheon of great presidents? or just presidents? >> well, you know, when you think about the great presidents, great necessities call forth great leaders. so george washington, abraham lincoln, fdr had a huge crises to face. obama had a pretty big crisis to face. he did accomplish in health care something since presidents since teddy roosevelt have been trying to accomplish. but i think most importantly, we'll see now the fact that he's got a second term, that's really important to embolden him for what he can accomplish, and more importantly, to show that the country supported kurg a very difficult time his leadership and they wanted him back again. so i think he's got a shot. it depends a lot on what happens in the second term, if he can create -- i wish he would go in the midterms to try to
to see republicans succeed. >> well, it is my sad duty to inform david that theodore roosevelt is dead, nelson rockefeller is dead, and yes, even richard nixon is dead. this republican party, he can attach whatever wings he wants to, i read his article carefully. he is brilliant, a writer about brain behavior. partisan politics, i'm not sure. this republican party is what it is, although interestingly, the republican party as it is right now, based in the south and the midwest, being what it is in the sort of ronald reagan-bush family image is moving very rapidly. don't forget, lawrence, within the last couple of weeks they caved on the fiscal cliff, at least temporarily. they just voted in john kerry by 94 to 3. and leaving aside the guys from texas and oklahoma, all the other republicans voted for john kerry. and they're moving very quickly on immigration. so i think on the one hand the party in its guts, in its roots is not about to change any time soon. and they can forget about the old northeastern republicans. on the other hand, they have looked into the abyss, i think, and they
it banned outright, prompting theodore roosevelt, a fan, to plead with organizers to tone it down. he succeeded and football has grown ever since. not terribly long after world war ii surging in popularity. >> and what changed that in the 1950s was television. television made it possible for football fans everywhere to follow professional football and it also opened it up a game for people who had no connection whatsoever with the universities. >> reporter: tv turned it into big league entertainment with slow-motion replays, cute cheerleaders and superstar athletes. today pro football has by far no more fans than any other american sport and each super bowl is a record breaker even before the kickoff. tom foreman, cnn, looking for tickets in washington. >>> coming up, what's a super bowl party without $65,000 worth of chicken wings? "the ridiculist" is next. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the onl
it outright, prompting theodore roosevelt to plead with organizers to tone it down. he succeeded, and football has grown, developing a professional league before world war i, and not long after world war ii surging in popularity. >> what changed that in the 1950s was television. television made it possible for football fans everywhere to follow professional football. it also opened it up then a game for people who had no connection what whatsoever universities. >> reporter: tv turned it into entertainment, with slow motion replay, cheerleaders athletes. now it is a record breaker even before the kickoff. tom foreman, cnn, looking for tickets tickets, in washington. >>> the riddiculis is next. ordinary rubs don't always work on my arthritis. try capzasin-hp. it penetrates deep to block pain signals for hours of relief. capzasin-hp. take the pain out of arthritis. >>> tonight we have a story from georgia where police say two employees of a cold storage facility outside atlanta broke in and stole -- wait for it, $65,000 worth of chicken wings. police say the two guys rented a truck, backed it up
than swore to it which the constitution -- the next was theodore roosevelt. a long time and that's because he took office after the death of the president and he was in a hotel in buffalo and apparently, they didn't have gideons' bibles around. he was the next one. and so, you look at those, three the last is lbj, who, of course, after another assassination, they had a catholic missile that he took the oath on. scattered throughout american history. >> have presidents invoked religion in their addresses, always? >> every president has invoked god or a deity in general, but not very specifically. none has actually mentioned jesus christ, four have invoked christianity. also uneven. >> has religion become more or less important over time in inaugural addresses? >> looking into the subject, i'm surprise s surprised to see the turning point came with fdr. first to have an invocation and benediction, the first to go to church on inauguration day. those things tradition nous are only as old as the 1930s and '40s. of t >> the significance of president obama using you dr. king's bible ca
in the year 1908, the president then theodore roosevelt took a major step grand canyon when he declared it a national monument. thousands of tourists had started exploring the site in arizona each year. among the visitors our 26th president who said you cannot improve on it. what you can do is keep it for your children's children and on. all who come after you as the one great site which every american can see. 11 years later congress updated the grand canyon to national park status. a president preserved one of our greatest national wonders and it happened 105 years ago today. and now you know the news for this friday, january 11th, 2013. i'm shepard smith. back tomorrow noon pacific, 3:00 eastern. no we are not. tomorrow is saturday. so you can come if you want to. but i ain't getting near this place. >> bill: the o'reilly factor is on. tonight: >> what do you do for a living? >> i'm on unemployment. >> are you the only occupier with a leather recliner? >> no, i'm not. >> some officials in hawaii angry with me for reporting on how liberal the aloha state really is we will talk with a
to provide the leadership that we need to get it right i believe. >> here's one issue. theodore roosevelt talked about the bully pulpit where it was used. we saw another issue of bill clinton at the convention with the ca passit ot explain and the president began to call him the explain never chief. are there limitations on this president's ability to move the public? >> you know, charlie, when i look at the things that we've accomplished, in part because of his ability to move the public, i would challenge the premise. because -- >> it wasn't a premise t was a question. >> yeah. >> i thought there was a premise behind the question opinions but you know, i think that his, you know t was his ability to persuade that allowed us to move forward on health care. health care would have died a thousand times but for barack obama and his commitment to it. >> rose: in the beginning when rahm said don't go for it. >> i think there were several phases alonged way. i went in to him, not to persuade him not to do it but to tell him about polling in the summer of 2009. i went through it and talked abou
. he's the only one we have. >> reporter: theodore roosevelt in 1905 was the first president to draw massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> that was a very unique year, 1945. in most normal situations, even if we're in a recession or if we're in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say, i know that i was, you know, a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. ♪ why not make lunch more than just lunch? with two times the points on dining in restaurants, you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the availa
politics. but he's the president. he's the only one we have. >> reporter: theodore roosevelt in 1905 was the first president to draw massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> that was a unique year, and most situations, even if we're in a recession or foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was, you know, a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male anno
campaign, theodore roosevelt's use of the word muckraker in a speech critical of specific journalists, and military industrial complex delivered by president eisenhower during his final presidential address to the american public in 961. 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i've been playing around with words for a long time, and i think when i was a kid, one of my -- i wasn't that athletic, and i wasn't that, you know, smart in various ways, but i could always go home and memorize a couple words, so i would learn words like ap nettic and things like that -- apathetic, you know, which for the third grader was a lot of of fun. and as i got to be an older person, i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of my favorite exercises was one time when my kids were young, you know, they worshiped the guinness book of world records, and in those days in order to get in the guinness book you had to either eat a bicycle or push a peanut across iowa with your nose to get in this book. so i was looking at the guinness book, and i came upon the
, an unusual place for a president to go. because that's where theodore roosevelt went. and in a high-water mark in the progressive era, you know, foreshadowing the bull moose party and his break with the republican party. the radicalization of t.r. i wouldn't say we saw the radicalization of barack obama. but we saw... i think this was the most ideologically assertive inaugural address since ronald reagan's first speech, this being the unreagan. >> brown: was it in overt language or symbols or we were talking earlier today as we were talking about the code... >> there was a coded language. talking about takers, we're not a nation of takers and so forth making reference to the sword and those kinds of things. he knows references that he knows people will understand and that codes people will get. so it was really about ideas. one of the things that i mentioned before about him not mentioning names, it was about ideals and ideas. so he was there, i think, summoning the will that beverly talked about. saying we are here together. this is your country. we are citizens. let's make it happ
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)

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